globe
  1. Books to Buy 3 items
    1. Film comedy - Geoff King 2002

      Book Essential reading

    2. Popular film and television comedy - Stephen Neale, Frank Krutnik 1990 (electronic resource)

      Book Essential reading

    3. Classical Hollywood comedy - Kristine Brunovska Karnick, Henry Jenkins 1995

      Book Essential reading

  2. Week One Lecture: Introduction: ‘Taking Comedy Seriously’ 8 items
    What is comedy? Something that makes us – or somebody – laugh? But what exactly is the basis of this particular reaction? How can we go beyond questions of ‘is it funny’ to understanding how and why? This session will introduce some of the general principles of the module, including an initial glance at some of the kinds of theories that have been used in attempts to explain or understand comedy. Seminar discussion will focus on a selection of screened comedy extracts.
    1. Screening: No screening this week

    2. Reading: 7 items
      1. Film comedy

        Chapter Recommended reading Read pp 1-18 , Introduction: Taking Comedy Seriously

      2. Popular film and television comedy - Stephen Neale, Frank Krutnik 1990 (electronic resource)

        Book Recommended reading Read: Definitions, genres and forms

      3. Comedy/cinema/theory - Andrew Horton 1991

        Book Recommended reading Introduction - Beginnings: the unbearable lightness of comic film theory

      4. Comedy - Stott, Andrew McConnel 2005

        Book Recommended reading especially ‘Introduction’ and chapter 6 pp 131-140

      5. Children and television: a semiotic approach - Robert Hodge, David Tripp 1986

        Book Recommended reading

  3. Week Two Lecture: Spanners in the Works: Slapstick and Comic Performance vs. Narrative 13 items
    What is the relationship between comic gags, slapstick, general silliness and the narrative structures in which it appears? To what extent does comedy disrupt or undermine narrative? We will start this week by taking an historical perspective, looking at the relationship between gag and narrative in the context of silent slapstick in the early decades of the 20th century. More recent ‘comedian comedy’, featuring performers such as Steve Martin, Robin Williams and Jim Carrey, will also be considered.
    1. Screening: 2 items
      1. Duck soup - Leo McCarey c2005 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Essential reading

      2. Secondary materials: Any films featuring central star comic performers, from Charles Chaplin to Bob Hope, Norman Wisdom and Jim Carrey.

    2. Primary Reading: 7 items
      1. Classical Hollywood comedy - Kristine Brunovska Karnick, Henry Jenkins 1995

        Book Essential reading A spanner in the works? genre, narrative and the Hollywood comedian

      2. Film comedy - Geoff King 2002

        Book Essential reading chapter 2 ‘Comedy and Narrative’

      3. Popular film and television comedy - Steve Neale, Frank Krutnik 1990

        Book Essential reading Chapter 6, ‘Hollywood, comedy, and The Case of Silent Slapstick

      4. Hollywood comedians, the film reader - Steve Seidman

        Chapter Essential reading read chapter 1, pp. 21-41, Performance, Enunication and Self- reference in Hollywood Comedian Comedy

      5. Classical Hollywood comedy - Kristine Brunovska Karnick, Henry Jenkins 1995

        Book Essential reading section on Narrative, ‘Introduction: Funny Stories

      6. Classical Hollywood comedy - Kristine Brunovska Karnick, Henry Jenkins 1995

        Book Essential reading • Tom Gunning, ‘Crazy Machines in the Garden of Forking Paths: Mischief Gags and the Origins of American Film Comedy’ and ‘Response to “Pie and Chase”

      7. Classical Hollywood comedy - Kristine Brunovska Karnick, Henry Jenkins 1995

        Book Essential reading • Donald Crafton, ‘Pie and Chase: Gag, Spectacle and Narrative in Slapstick Comedy

    3. Reading: 4 items
      1. What made pistachio nuts?: early sound comedy and the vaudeville aesthetic - Henry Jenkins 1992

        Book Other reading

      2. Hollywood comedians, the film reader - Frank Krutnik 2003

        Book Other reading various essays, see especially those by Seidman (listed above), Henry Jenkins, and Philip Drake

      3. Cinema and language - Patricia Mellencamp

        Chapter Other reading read pp. 63-78, Jokes and Their Relation to the Marx Brothers

      4. Canned goods as caviar: American film comedy of the 1930's - Weales, Gerald 1985

        Book Other reading Chapter 3, ‘Duck Soup’

  4. Week Three Lecture: From Grotesque to Gross-Out: Crudity, Carnivalesque and the Cultural Meaning of Comedy 26 items
    Why do so many comedy routines revolve around activities such as farting, shitting or other ‘unspeakable’ activities involving bodily fluids? How can this kind of comedy be ‘taken seriously’ rather than dismissed as of little worth? Our focus this week will be on theories of the ‘carnivalesque’ and the socio-cultural dimensions of this kind of comedy – a licensed overturning of cultural norms?
    1. Screening: 1 item
      1. American pie - Herz, Adam, Weitz, Paul 2003 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Essential reading

    2. Secondary materials: 9 items
      1. National Lampoon's animal house - Landis, John, Simmons, Matty, Reitman, Ivan 2003 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Recommended reading

      2. There's something about Mary - Farrelly, Peter, Farrelly, Bobby, Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment, Inc c1998 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Recommended reading

      3. Kevin & Perry go large - Ed Bye, Tiger Aspect Pictures (Firm), Icon Productions c2007 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Recommended reading

      4. Me, myself & Irene - Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation [2000] (dvd)

        Audio-visual document Recommended reading

      5. The hottie & the nottie - Reda, Hadeel, Ferrer, Heidi, Purple Pictures (Firm) c2008 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Recommended reading

      6. Bridesmaids - Paul Feig, Judd Apatow, Clayton Townsend, Barry Mendel c2010 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Recommended reading

      7. Other 'gross-out' films; TV from The Young Ones to South Park and beyond

      8. South Park: Vol. 1 - Trey Parker, Matt Stone, Brian Craden, Comedy Central (Firm) c1998 (videorecording)

        Book Recommended reading

      9. The Young ones: series 1 - Adrian Edmondson, Rik Mayall, Nigel Planer, Chris Ryan c1990 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Recommended reading

    3. Primary Reading: 3 items
      1. Rabelais and his world

        Chapter Essential reading Read pp. 303-368, The grotesque image of the body and its sources

      2. Film comedy - Geoff King 2002

        Book Essential reading chapter 2, Transgressions and regressions pp 63-77

      3. Laughing matters : understanding film, television and radio comedy - White, Glyn 2013

        Book Essential reading Read Chapter 9, pp. 207 - 230, Comedy and cultural value: from bad taste to gross-out

    4. Reading: 13 items
      1. Laughing, screaming: modern Hollywood horror and comedy - William Paul c1994

        Book Other reading Parts 1 and 2

      2. Comedy - Andrew McConnel Stott 2005

        Book Other reading chapter 1, pp 32-39, chapter 2 pp 51-55, chapter 4 ‘The Body’

      3. Underground U.S.A.: filmmaking beyond the Hollywood canon

        Chapter Other reading read chapter 19, pp. 204-220, Tasteless Art: Waters, Kaufman and the Pursuit of ‘Pure’ Gross-Out

      4. Implicit meanings: selected essays in anthropology - Mary Douglas 1999

        Book Other reading Mary Douglas, ‘Jokes’,

      5. Comedy taste : highbrow/lowbrow comedy and cultural capital - Nathalie Claessens, Alexander Dhoest 2010

        Article Other reading

      6. Implicit meanings: selected essays in anthropology - Mary Douglas 1999

        Book Other reading ‘Do Dogs Laugh?’

      7. Classical Hollywood comedy - Kristine Brunovska Karnick, Henry Jenkins 1995

        Book Other reading • Kristine Brunovska Karnick and Henry Jenkins, ‘Comedy and the Social World’, pp. 265-75, in chapter 13 (a useful summary of elements of Bakhtin, Douglas and others)

      8. Humor and laughter: an anthropological approach - Mahadev L. Apte 1985

        Book Other reading Chapter 5: Humor in Religion & Chapter 7: The Trickster in Folklore

      9. Bakhtinian thought: an introductory reader

        Chapter Other reading read chapter 3, pp. 65-87, Bakhtin’s Carnival

      10. Common factors, vulgar factions

        Chapter Other reading Read pp. 24 -39, Laffs

      11. Taking humour seriously - Jerry Palmer 1994

        Book Other reading

  5. Week Four Lecture: Comedy and Regression 12 items
    Comedy often seems to involve a process of regression on the part of the comic performer, to a state akin to that of childhood or infancy. How might this kind of comedy be understood, particularly in reference to psychoanalytical theory? Why might the spectacle of regression be a comically pleasurable one, or one that causes irritation (as is often the case for the modern viewer of Jerry Lewis, star of this week’s screening and the focus of the primary reading material)?
    1. Screening: 1 item
      1. The disorderly orderly [2004] (dvd)

        Audio-visual document Essential reading

    2. Secondary materials: 2 items
      Any other films featuring Jerry Lewis or other ‘childlike’ comic performers, from Harry Langdon to Pee Wee Herman, or Michael Crawford in Some Mothers Do ‘Av Em to more recent figures
      1. The nutty professor - Jerry Lewis 1996 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Recommended reading Jerry Lewis example

      2. Some Mothers Do ‘Ave ‘Em Tuesday, 26 Sep 2017

        Audio-visual document Recommended reading Michael Crawford example

    3. Primary Reading 4 items
      1. Comedy/cinema/theory - Andrew Horton c1991

        Book Essential reading • Bukatman, Scott, ‘Paralysis in Motion: Jerry Lewis’s Life as a Man’

      2. The cinematic body

        Chapter Essential reading read pp. 106-124, Comedies of abjection: Jerry Lewis

      3. Laughing hysterically: American screen comedy of the 1950s

        Chapter Essential reading Read Chapter 4, pp. 179-245, Living looney tunes: the art of Frank Tashlin

    4. Reading: 5 items
      1. The logic of the absurd: on film and television comedy - Jerry Palmer, British Film Institute 1987

        Book Other reading a useful summary of Freud’s Jokes and Their Relation to the Unconscious.

      2. Jokes and their relation to the unconscious - Sigmund Freud, James Strachey, Angela Richards, Institute of Psycho-Analysis 1976

        Book Other reading

      3. Cinema and language

        Chapter Other reading read pp. 63-78, Jokes and Their Relation to the Marx Brothers

      4. Popular film and television comedy - Steve Neale, Frank Krutnik 1990

        Book Other reading chapter 4, ‘Laughter, humour and the comic’; chapter 7, ‘The comedy of the sexes’

  6. Week Five: Reading Week 0 items
  7. Week Six Lecture: Television Sitcom (LH) 14 items
    Sitcom is the most studied form of television comedy, analysed for its representations of gender, ethnicity and class and seen as a quintessential format for the medium – ‘domestic’, rooted in dialogue and performance. While programmes like The Young Ones sought to deconstruct the genre, its visual style and production methods remained relatively unchanged until recently – shot three-camera style in front of a studio audience. However, a broader range of ‘looks’ have started to appear in the genre, from the animation of The Simpsons and South Park to the heavily stylised Spaced, from the ‘docu-soap’ look of The Office to the use of point of view in Peep Show. One of the most interesting aesthetic shifts has been the use of recorded laughter (‘canned’ or studio audience generated) – long a mainstay of sitcom, it seemed to be going out of fashion in single camera sitcoms but is currently staging a revival. This lecture will look at ‘classic’ sitcom style, but also examine some of the recent stylistic shifts and their implications.
    1. Screening: 3 items
      1. Peep show: Series 1 4 3/4 in (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Essential reading

      2. The IT crowd: The complete first season - Ash Atalla, Derrin Schlesinger, Graham Linehan, Chris O'Dowd c2009 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Essential reading

      3. Arrested development: Season one - Mitchell Hurwitz, Jason Bateman, Portia De Rossi, Will Arnett c2009 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Essential reading

    2. Primary reading: 3 items
      1. Television sitcom - Brett Mills 2005

        Book Essential reading Read chapter 1, pp. 1-24, Introduction

      2. Cult British TV comedy: from Reeves and Mortimer to Psychoville - Leon Hunt 2013 (electronic resource)

        Book Essential reading ch. 3 (on the sitcom work of Graham Linehan) and pp. 129-137 (on recorded laughter)

    3. Secondary reading: 8 items
      1. The sitcom - Mills, Brett c2009

        Book Other reading

      2. The television genre book - Brett Mills

        Chapter Other reading read pp. 88-91 Contemporary sitcom

      3. Popular film and television comedy - Steve Neale, Frank Krutnik 1990

        Book Other reading ch.8

      4. Television sitcom - Jim Cook, British Film Institute 1982, c1984

        Book Other reading

      5. Understanding television - Andrew Goodwin, Garry Whannel 1990

        Book Other reading • Mick Bowes ‘Only When I Laugh’

      6. Comic visions: television comedy and American culture - David Marc 1997

        Book Other reading

      7. The office - Walters, Ben 2005

        Book Other reading

  8. Week Seven Lecture: ‘Patchy in places’: TV Sketch Comedy (LH) 12 items
    The sketch show has two, seemingly very different, heritages - one rooted in variety and music hall, the other in Cambridge Footlights (seen as a more innovative and anarchic tradition - see, for example, the critical reputation of Monty Python's Flying Circus). It has also sometimes been seen as the poor relation to sitcom (which can be viewed as comic drama) and has received much less critical and academic attention. It has a reputation for unevenness (even in its most celebrated examples), but it has lent itself both to the 'flow' of TV and the isolation of favourite or 'classic' sketches on YouTube. This lecture will examine the form and dynamics of both the sketch show and the individual sketch, as well as some of the different approaches to the format
    1. Screening: 3 items
      1. Monty Python's Flying Circus: The complete first series - Graham Chapman, Terry Gilliam, Terry Jones, John Cleese 2007 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Essential reading

      2. The fast show: Volume 1 - John Birkin, Archie Dyson 2007 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Essential reading

      3. Monkey Dust

        Audio-visual document Essential reading

    2. Readings: 4 items
      1. Cult British TV comedy: from Reeves and Mortimer to Psychoville - Leon Hunt 2013 (electronic resource)

        Book Recommended reading ch. 4

      2. Popular film and television comedy - Stephen Neale, Frank Krutnik 1990 (electronic resource)

        Book Recommended reading ch. 8

      3. Sunshine on putty: the golden age of British comedy, from Vic Reeves to The office - Ben Thompson 2004

        Book Recommended reading material on The Fast Show, The League of Gentlemen, Little Britain and others.

    3. On specific TV sketch shows: 5 items
      1. Monty Python's Flying Circus (TV Milestones) - Marcia Landy March 28, 2005 (Paperback)

        Book Recommended reading

      2. Monty Python: complete and utter theory of the grotesque - John O. Thompson 1982

        Book Recommended reading

      3. London and contemporary Britain in Monkey Dust - Claire Monk 08/03/2008

        Article Recommended reading

      4. The league of gentlemen - Leon Hunt 2008

        Book Recommended reading

  9. Week Eight Lecture: From ‘Alternative’ to Cult Comedy: British TV Comedy (LH) 12 items
    The phrase ‘Alternative Comedy’ has been applied both to a specific group of oppositional comedians mainly associated with The Comedy Store club and to a longer tradition that can stretch back to Monty Python or Spike Milligan. However, with the huge success of Little Britain, what exactly is the difference between cult and mainstream British comedy? We will look at three areas. Firstly, cult comedy’s ‘cultural capital’ has undergone a series of shifts from the intellectual references of Monty Python and Peter Cook, to the ‘political correctness’ of the Comedy Store performers to the pop culture references of more recent comedy like The League of Gentlemen. Secondly, ‘alternative’ comedy is institutionally determined by the public service demand for ‘innovation’, the niche targeting of older (BBC2, Ch 4) and newer (BBC3) channels), and developments in comedy management. Finally, ‘cult comedy’ is defined by a particular kind of fan consumption, which is intensified by the ‘intimacy’ created by DVD commentaries and the creation of ‘worlds’ that can be explored as obsessively as those of non-comic genres like SF/Fantasy.
    1. Screening: 3 items
      1. The original Vic Reeves big night out 2005 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Essential reading

      2. The league of gentlemen: Christmas special - Bendelack, Steve, Rodgers, Jemma 2002 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Essential reading

      3. Stewart Lee's comedy vechicle: [Series one] - Stewart Lee 2009 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Essential reading

    2. Primary reading: 4 items
      1. Sunshine on putty: the golden age of British comedy, from Vic Reeves to The office

        Chapter Essential reading read chapter 1, pp. 3-22, On the launchpad: the Reeves and Mortimer despot/democrat trajectory is about to commence

      2. Sunshine on putty: the golden age of British comedy, from Vic Reeves to The office - Ben Thompson 2004

        Book Essential reading Read Chapter 21

      3. Cult British TV comedy: from Reeves and Mortimer to Psychoville

        Chapter Essential reading Read Chapter 1, pp 1-35, From alternative to cult: mapping post-alternative comedy

      4. Popular film and television comedy - Steve Neale, Frank Krutnik 1990

        Book Essential reading Chapter 8 - Comedy, television, and variety, 176-208 & Chapter 9 - Broadcast comedy and sit-com, 209-261

    3. Secondary reading: 5 items
      1. The league of gentlemen - Hunt, Leon 2008

        Book Recommended reading

      2. Horribly awkward: the new funny bone - Page, Edwin c2008

        Book Recommended reading

      3. Didn't you kill my mother-in-law?: the story of alternative comedy in Britain from the Comedy Store to Saturday Live - Roger Wilmut, Peter Rosengard 1989

        Book Recommended reading

      4. Because I tell a joke or two: comedy, politics and social difference - Michael Pickering

        Chapter Recommended reading read chapter 15, pp. 291-312, Heard the One About the White Middle-Class Heterosexual Father-in-Law? Gender, Ethnicity and Political Correctness in Comedy

      5. Television sitcom - Brett Mills 2005

        Book Recommended reading Read chapter: 'Sitcom and genre', pp 25-66

  10. Week Nine Lecture: Satire and Parody 32 items
    Satire and Parody are two forms of comedy that involve mockery and ridicule. Both entail victims, but of different kinds. This week’s lecture will start with definitions of the two forms before going on to explore some of the implications of the use of specifically comic strategies in both cases.
    1. Screening: (1 1 item
      1. Brass eye - Morris, Chris, Cumming, Michael, Baynham, Peter, Bussmann, Jane 2002 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Essential reading

    2. Secondary materials: 13 items
      1. TV satire from

      2. Spitting image: The complete first series - Peter Harris, Tony Hendra, John Lloyd 2008 (dvd)

        Audio-visual document Recommended reading

      3. to the satirical/parodic

      4. Brass eye - Chris Morris, Michael Cumming, Peter Baynham, Jane Bussmann 2002 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Recommended reading

      5. The thick of it: the complete first series - Iannucci, Armando, British Broadcasting Corporation, 2 Entertain (Firm) 2007 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Recommended reading

      6. American political satires including

      7. Wag the dog - Henkin, Hilary, Mamet, David, Levinson, Barry, Beinhart, Larry 1999 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Recommended reading

      8. Bulworth - Beatty, Warren 2002 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Recommended reading

      9. Dr. Strangelove: or how I learned to stop worrying and love the bomb - Kubrick, Stanley, George, Peter (DVD)

        Audio-visual document Recommended reading

      10. Borat: cultural learnings of America for make benefit glorious nation of Kazakhstan - Sacha Baron Cohen 2007 (videorecording)

        Book Recommended reading

      11. any film or TV parody from

      12. Blazing saddles: Never give a saga an even break! - Hertzberg, Michael, Brooks, Mel 2002 (DVD)

        Audio-visual document Other reading Screening

      13. to the latest trend to be spoofed

    3. Primary reading 7 items
      1. Film comedy - Geoff King 2002

        Book Essential reading chapter 3, Satire and Parody

      2. Satire TV: politics and comedy in the post-network era - Jonathan Gray, Jeffrey P. Jones, Ethan Thompson 2009

        Book Essential reading especially ‘Introduction’

      3. Come on down?: popular media culture in post-war Britain - Dominic Strinati, Stephen Wagg 1992

        Book Essential reading You’ve never had it so silly: The politics of British satirical comedy from Beyond the Fringe to Spitting Image

      4. No known cure: the comedy of Chris Morris - James Leggott, Jamie Sexton 2013

        Book Essential reading Chapter by Craig Hight, 'Mocking the News: The Day Today and Brass Eye as Mockumentary News Satire

      5. Film parody

        Chapter Essential reading read chapter 1, pp. 3-10, Introducing the anti-canon-as-canon

      6. Comedy - Andrew McConnel Stott 2005

        Book Essential reading chapter 5, ‘Politics’

      7. Documentary's awkward turn: cringe comedy and media spectatorship - Jason Middleton 2014 (electronic resource)

        Book Recommended reading See chapter 3, 'Awkward Satire: Comedies of Deception'

    4. Reading 11 items
      1. Dissident voices: the politics of television and cultural change - Peter Keighron

        Chapter Recommended reading read chapter 8, pp. 127-144, Politics of Ridicule: Satire and Television

      2. Popular television in Britain: studies in cultural history - Andrew Crisell

        Chapter Recommended reading read pp. 145-158, Filfth, Sedition and Blasphemy: The Rise and Fall of Satire

      3. Anatomy of criticism: four essays

        Chapter Recommended reading read pp. 223-239, The mythos of winter: irony and satire

      4. Popular film and television comedy - Stephen Neale, Frank Krutnik 1990 (electronic resource)

        Book Recommended reading Parody and satire pp. 18-20

      5. Parody: ancient, modern, and post-modern

        Chapter Recommended reading read Part 1 chapter 1 pp5-53 ‘Defining parody from the Ancients onwards’

      6. Parody: ancient, modern, and post-modern - Margaret A. Rose 1993

        Book Recommended reading Part 1 ‘Defining parody from the Ancients onwards’ ch2 distinguishing parody from related forms

      7. The politics of postmodernism - Linda Hutcheon 2002

        Book Recommended reading Chapter 4 The politics of parody

      8. Beyond the multiplex: cinema, new technologies, and the home

        Chapter Recommended reading To infinity and beyond: the web short, parody, and remediation

      9. Film history: an introduction

        Chapter Recommended reading Read Chapter 23, pp 544-545, Politically critical cinema of the 1960s and 1970s & Read Chapter 26 pp 634-639, Beyond the industrialized West: Latin America, the Asia-Pacific region, the Middle East, and Africa since the 1970s

      10. Inside Soviet film satire: laughter with a lash - Horton, Andrew 1993

        Book Recommended reading

  11. Week Ten Lecture: Comedy Beyond Comedy: From Comic Relief to (Very) Dark Tones 21 items
    What is the function or effect of comedy beyond its normal bounds; beyond a clear-cut sense of comedy as a genre or modality? Comedy is often used as a form of ‘relief’ in primarily non-comic forms or contexts, but the mixture of comedy and other qualities can also be challenging or disturbing, as will be seen in some very dark examples considered in this week’s screening and lecture.
    1. Screening: 1 item
      1. Four lions c2010 (DVD)

        Audio-visual document Essential reading

    2. Secondary materials: 9 items
      1. Pulp fiction - Quentin Tarantino, Lawrence Bender, Miramax 2002 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Recommended reading

      2. The Searchers - John Ford 2005 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Recommended reading

      3. American psycho - Harron, Mary, Ellis, Bret Easton [2005 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Recommended reading

      4. Happiness - Todd Solondz 2008 (videorecording)

        Audio-visual document Recommended reading

      5. Secrets & lies - Leigh, Mike [2005] (DVD)

        Audio-visual document Recommended reading

      6. or other films by Mike Leigh

      7. Man bites dog - Poelvoorde, Benoit, Belvaux, Remy, Andrâe Bonzel 2004 (DVD)

        Audio-visual document Recommended reading

      8. Jam - Morris, Christopher, Baynham, Peter, Bullmore, Amelia c2000 (DVD)

        Audio-visual document Recommended reading

      9. Nighty night - Davis, Julia 2005 (DVD)

        Audio-visual document Recommended reading

    3. Primary Reading 2 items
      1. Film comedy - Geoff King 2002

        Book Essential reading chapter 5, comedy beyond comedy

      2. Cult British TV comedy: from Reeves and Mortimer to Psychoville - Leon Hunt 2013 (electronic resource)

        Book Recommended reading chapter 7, 'Are You Sitting Uncomfortably? From "Cringe" to Dark Comedy; chapter 8, 'Near the knuckle? It nearly took my arm off! British Comedy and the 'New Offensiveness'

    4. Reading 9 items
      1. No known cure: the comedy of Chris Morris

        Chapter Recommended reading Read especially Chapter 12, pp197-211.Sharon Lockyer, 'Dads Army Side to Terrorism: Chris Morris, Four Lions and Jihad comedy'

      2. No known cure: the comedy of Chris Morris - James Leggott, Jamie Sexton 2013

        Book Recommended reading See especially Chapter 9, Jamie Sexton, 'Lost in Techno Trance: Dance Culture, Drugs and The Digital Image in Jam'

      3. Beyond genre: melodrama, comedy and romance in Hollywood films - Thomas, Deborah 2000

        Book Recommended reading

      4. Hitchcock: suspense, humour and tone - Smith, Susan 2000

        Book Recommended reading

      5. Beyond a joke: the limits of humour - Sharon Lockyer, Michael Pickering 2009

        Book Recommended reading

      6. Experimental British television - Brett Mills

        Chapter Recommended reading read chapter 11 pp. 180-194, 'Yes, it’s War!': Chris Morris and comedy's representational strategies

      7. New Hollywood violence - Geoff King

        Chapter Recommended reading read chapter 6, pp. 126-143, "Killingly Funny": Mixing modalities in New Hollywood’s comedy-with-violence

      8. Comedy - Stott, Andrew 2005

        Book Recommended reading chapter 5, ‘Politics’

  12.  

     

    Week Eleven: Exam Practice

    Screening: to be announced

     

    There will be no lecture this week. Instead, there is a screening and seminars in which you will be asked to explore various different ways of bring the perspectives introduced so far on the module to the text screened. This will be useful preparation for the examination in the following week. It is essential that you attend the screening, or see the film yourself soon beforehand, if you are to gain any benefit from this session.

  13. Week Twelve

     

    ***This week there will be a 'take away' exam ***

     

    This will involve the screening in class time (to be confirmed) of an extract. You will then be required to submit a written analysis of some of the comedy in the extract, maximum 2,500 words.

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